Ann Warde

_Ann_5May2015As a composer and bioacoustics researcher, I work with sound from both musical and scientific perspectives. I’ve contributed to the use and development of sound analysis software tools to help us identify and understand the characteristic vocalization behavior of marine and terrestrial animals. However,  over this past year I’ve been working with spatial, surround-sound realizations of recordings of animal voices. And through this different, expansive kind of listening, I’ve begun to more carefully consider differences in the ways that we and other species perceive sound. And I’m beginning to ask questions about how our different perceptions of sound may be linked in various ways to the environments within which we (different groups of people, and individuals within those groups, as well as other animals) live our lives. Studying the variability of animal sounds can help us to ask questions about their evolution over time and space . . . which brings up, in turn, questions about the role of the environment in shaping, over time, the sounds of those who live within it. My compositions sometimes explore algorithmic and interactive acoustic and electroacoustic environments, and they have included scientific and mathematical materials as sources for musical structures. I’ve found that my interest in the social dynamics of performance has informed my study of Javanese and Balinese gamelan — specifically invention in contemporary music by Indonesian composers. And it has also informed my investigations of specific ways in which electronics might be involved in the configuring of relationships among performers and among performers and listeners.